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Joseph+Banks

Joseph Banks Exhibition

15 February - 11 May 2014

An exciting new exhibition about Joseph Banks, the Lincolnshire – based naturalist, botanist and explorer who accompanied Captain James Cook, to explore the uncharted lands of the South Pacific. Find out about this eminent local figure and how his important work captured the world's imagination.


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Lincolnshire's heritage is a rich, diverse and precious legacy. Your donations will be used to improve your visit through better exhibitions, increased digitisation and conservation work. Your generosity will help to preserve and keep vibrant our heritage for future generations. Thank you for your support.

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  • 500,000BC - 2,300BC

    Handaxe from Saint Acheul

    Handaxe from Saint Acheul

    One of the earliest human tools, discovered in France in 1872 by the antiquarian Sir John Evans

  • 500,000BC - 2,300BC

    Welton le wold axe

    Welton le wold axe

    Found at Welton leWold in 1973. This is one of the earliest tools known from Lincolnshire

  • 500,000BC - 2,300BC

    Mammoth tooth

    Mammoth tooth

    Tooth from a woolly mammoth which roamed Lincolnshire around 10,000 years ago

  • 500,000BC - 2,300BC

    Polished / grained hammer stone from Ludford

    Macehead

    Made from an attractive banded stone, was this macehead for use or an ornament?

  • 500,000BC - 2,300BC

    Neolithic polished axe

    Neolithic polished axe

    Found at Reepham, near Lincoln. These axes are some of the most common Neolithic finds

  • 2,300BC = 700BC

    Sudbrook torc

    This torc was worn around the neck at a time when gold was first being used. Found at Sudbrook

  • 2,300BC = 700BC

    Baumber bangle

    The workmanship on this early piece of jewellery suggests it was unfinished

  • 2,300BC = 700BC

    Bronze sword

    These elegant weapons are the first swords in British history. Found at Bardney in 1908.

  • 2,300BC = 700BC

    Bronze Age beaker

    This ceramic drinking cup has a handle and was decorated using twigs and twisted cord

  • 2,300BC = 700BC

    Faience bead (star shaped)

    This bead was found in a burial mound at Stainsby. It is made of faience and is from Central Europe.

  • 700BC = AD43

    Banks sword scabbard

    This sword and scabbard were found in the River Witham in 1787 and once owned by Sir Joseph Banks.

  • 700BC = AD43

    Normanby le Wold brooch

    This is one of only 7 Iron Age gold brooches in the country. Can you see the beaked face?

  • 700BC = AD43

    Rothwell boar

    This detailed and realistic boar was probably made to be a religious offering, thrown into a river

  • AD43 = AD410

    Statuette of Minerva

    This statuette is in a classical style, and shows the Goddess wearing armour under her robes.

  • AD43 = AD410

    Greyhound brooch

    This rare example of a realistic greyhound was probably made for someone who liked or raced dogs.

  • AD43 = AD410

    Lincoln boy charioteer

    This delicate carving probably came from a tombstone and shows a boy holding the reigns of a chariot.

  • AD410 = AD1066

    Viking axe from Witham

    This Viking axe was found at Lincoln. It was made for chopping wood but could also have been a weapon.

  • AD410 = AD1066

    Hanging Bowl (Loveden Hill)

    This highly decorated bowl was found in a grave. It was deliberately damaged before being buried.

  • AD1066 = AD1485

    1072 transfer of See to Lincoln

    By this small deed, William the Conqueror gave the site for, and endowed, the new cathedral of Lincoln.

  • AD1066 = AD1485

    Medieval sword from Witham

    This 14th Century sword was found in the River Witham in 1787. It has bronze crosses inlaid in the blade.

  • AD1066 = AD1485

    Reliquary box

    This small, lockable casket was probably used for storing valuable personal items such as jewellery.

  • AD1066 = AD1485

    John of Gaunt's Will

    The Will of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster (died 1399), was copied into the Register of the Bishop of Lincoln.

  • AD1066 = AD1485

    Pedigree of the Kings of Britain

    Part of a royal pedigree, drawn on to a long roll of parchment. It claims that Henry VI was descended from Noah.

  • AD1714 = AD1837

    Mantua

    This silk dress was made in the early 18th Century and is a rare survival.

  • AD1714 = AD1837

    Georgian bird scarer

    This simple object is designed to scare birds away from crops and was made in about 1820

  • AD1714 = AD1837

    George III ring watch

    This silver, gold and diamond ring watch is believed to have been given to King George III by the maker, John Arnold.

  • AD1714 = AD1837

    Robert Sutton longcase clock

    This longcase clock was made by Robert Sutton of Barton on Humber. The clock's movements are made of wood.

  • AD1901 = AD1918

    WWI battlefield cross

    Battlefield cross, erected for an unknown soldier of the Lincolnshire Regiment in the First World War

  • AD1901 = AD1918

    Lincoln Elk motorcycle (1917)

    This motorcycle was manufactured on Broadgate, Lincoln in 1917.

  • AD1901 = AD1918

    20th C studio pottery

    This vase is inspired by Japanese design, and has been coloured using white, brown and green slip.

  • AD1901 = AD1918

    Trench Art

    These bronze shell cases were decorated by soldiers from the Lincolnshire Regiment during the First World War.

  • AD1901 = AD1918

    Images of Lincoln tank production

    The tank production line at the works of William Foster and Co, Lincoln.

  • AD1901 = AD1918

    Photograph from typhoid epidemic

    Residents of Lincoln collecting clean water from Holmes Siding during the epidemic of 1905.

  • © 2012 Lincs To The Past, Lincolnshire Archives

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