• Shopping Basket: 0 items
  • Sign in or Register to start shopping


St Helen's Church and Churchyard, North Ormsby



Reference Name MLI41149

Name:
St Helen's Church and Churchyard, North Ormsby

Summary:
19th century church, now house, which retains some 13th century details of a previous church. Six late Saxon burials were reportedly found in the churchyard.

Location:
NORTH ORMSBY, EAST LINDSEY, LINCOLNSHIRE

Description:
Parish church, now closed, and tomb enclosure. The building was constructed of limestone rubble in 1848 by S. S.Teulon, in an Early English style. It has green slate and stone coped roofs. There is also a nave with a western bellcote and porch and a chancel. The west door is between two stepped buttresses and covered by gabled porch. Above a two light window is a trefoil headed niche and gabled bellcote. The nave side walls have three paired trefoil headed lancets. The chancel side walls have two single lancets and on the south side a pointed doorway with moulded hood and label stops. The east window is of three lights with geometric tracery and a moulded hood. To the east of the chancel is a cast iron railed grave enclosure and an urn pedestal tomb to Mary Russell who died in 1855. Inside the building is a single chamfered chancel arch with octagonal imposts on human head corbels. There is also an arch braced roof on moulded corbels. All the fittings were removed apart from the 19th century pulpit and 15th century octagonal font. For the full description and the legal address of this listed building please refer to the appropriate List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. {1}

St. Helen's Church was designed and built by S.S. Teulon in 1848 and retains some late 13th century details. {2}{3}

The church was made redundant in 1981 and was converted to a private house shortly after this date. Beneath the east window was a stone which was probably from the old church. {4}

Possibly six graves were found in Ormsby churchyard [presumed to be North Ormsby] which are probably late Saxon in date. The graves were cut out of the natural chalk and enclosed by sandstone blocks. {5}

The monument in the churchyard to the east of the chancel is to members of the Ansell family and the inscription on the urn is to Mary Sophia Ansell who died in 1855 (contra source 1 and source 4). {6}

Sources:
1 Index: Department of the Environment. 1986. List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. 3/37
2 Index: SMR. Sites and Monuments Record Card Index. TF 29 SE: O, 1983, D.E.S.
3 Bibliographic reference: Pevsner, N., and Harris, J.. 1964. Buildings of England (first edition). Lincolnshire. p.327
4 Bibliographic reference: Pevsner, N. and Harris, J., with Antram, N.. 1989. Buildings of England (Second Edition). Lincolnshire. p.584
5 Article in serial: 1864. Associated Architectural and Archaeological Societies’ Reports and Papers. Trollope, E. p.xcii
6 Correspondence: S.B.C.. 2016. Correspondence from the owners of the former St Helen's Church now called Newton Hall. 19 May 2016

Historic Environment Record

Further information can be found at: Historic Environment Record

For more detailed/specific searches you may use: Advanced search

Helpful Hint: Please quote the Reference Name / Number or the Lincstothepast item URL when contacting the Historic Environment Team.

Helpful hint: If you want to search a particular collection, or filter out unwanted collections/records – remember you can use the facetted searching to refine your results (see right hand side of your search results page).

Associated Records

Last updated: 04-December-2016 14:46:26

Bookmark with:

What are these?

  • © 2012 Lincs To The Past, Lincolnshire Archives

Powered by Webstructure.NET